MORTICIA-THE SAP IS RUNNING-COPPER DYE-THE BARN

1 04 2014

HELLO

My computer is running very slow, tried a couple of things today but it only did a little

MORTICIA

Snacks of cantaloupe were served yesterday afternoon and Morticia hopped right down from the nest.

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I took this picture and removed the egg that was laid yesterday.

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ALL EGGS ARE MARKED NOW.

THE SAP IS RUNNING

I do love this time of year, there are many small syrup making operations in this area and a couple of very large ones.  Davenports in Shelburne is a great place to go.  The food is great and the views are spectacular..  I hope to sugar next year.

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COPPER DYE

I found a gallon of copper dye that I had made last fall and dyed this wool.  I like the color it came out but I did have to dip it several times.  The dye I made recently was made for some very old ammonia and didn’t do well, so I have another going.

before and after dyeing

before and after dyeing

THE BARN

Lauren, Tyler and Charlie dug trenches and cleaned some of the barn and placed the sandbags in front of the door on Sunday.  On Sunday night we had lots of rain and none came into the barn.  There are still puddles of water but with this lovely warm weather today it will dry up soon.

Many thanks for reading my blog on this sunny day, clothes are drying in the gentle breezes.  Carole

 

 

 

 

 

 

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RUG HOOKING WITH YARN-A DYE STUDY GROUP-COPPER DYE UPDATE

22 03 2014

Hello

Second Day of Spring

Snow flurries are fluttering about this morning while the temps hover below freezing.  Last night the winds were howling, but it will warm up today and this may be winters last gasp.

RUG HOOKING WITH YARN by JUDY TAYLOR

Rug hooking with wool was thought to have started somewhere in the 4th century with tufts of wool.  Methods improved and burlap was being used  as a backing in the 19th century, people were gathering thrums from the weaving or spinning room floors in mills and using them in their rugs.

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This book has been quite useful to me.  It covers hooking with yarn completely.  More and more people have stashes of yarn and this is a wonderful way to use them up. 

In this book you will find out how to figure how much yarn you will need to complete a project, many methods of dyeing, and much more.

NATURAL DYE STUDY GROUP

This summer we plan to have a dye study group.  I am not sure exactly how it will work out.  Maybe we all bring  wool, and other fibers and divide them up.    I will investigate how other groups have done it.  It will be fun.  The blue dye is coming along nicely.

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Chris is here and we  are ready to tackle the barn tomorrow.  I hope we can get a good chunk of it done.

Hope you had a wonderful day and many thanks for taking the time to read my blog.   Carole





A CALENDAR OF COMMON DYE PLANTS-PUSSY WILLOWS-COPPER DYE RECIPE

20 03 2014

HAPPY SPRING

SHORTY THINKS NAPS ARE IMPORTANT

SHORTY’S WAY OF GETTING READY FOR SPRING

A CALENDER OF COMMON DYE PLANTS

Some years ago I got a wonderful Newsletter from England.  It was about all sorts of needlecrafts including spinning and dyeing.  I looked forward to it so much.  The articles were wonderful and the editor was Rowena Edlin-While who has written a few books.  She and Dee Duke wrote a series of small books about spinning and dyeing and I purchased this one.

This was a very reasonable book and most of the plants listed are grown here in the states.  ONe of the dyes is Coltsfoot, a plant which is seen on the side of the road in April, it produces a yellow dye.  With each dye recipe there are interesting tidbits about the dye plant.

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PUSSY WILLOWS

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The pussy willows are in full bloom now, I have cut the branches that need to be away from the roof but they are still iced onto the roof.    I think I will root a few this year in water and put them in other locations. 

INSTANT COPPER DYE RECIPE

Always use caution when making this dye as ammonia  is a dangerous substance.  Read the label and wear safety glasses when pouring.

Place a 12 inch piece of copper pipe or anything copper (pennies will do) into a gallon glass jar which has a cover.  Also pour in one quart of ammonia (CLEAR NOT SUDSY) add 3 quarts of water.  Cover and let stand for 1 week.  When the color changes from a light blue to a deep royal blue its ready.   Drop in a handful of wet, clean fleeces, wet cotton or silk, most fibers will work.  You don’t need to stir it but don’t let the fiber lay on top.  Take it out in 15 minutes or before if the color is to your liking.. You may put the fiber in for a little longer if you want a darker color.  I would not leave anything in longer than 25 minutes as it can be damaging to your fibers.  I have found that 10 minutes is enough time to absorb the dye.  Rinse your fiber well

When we did this as a group and we found everyone’s dye was different, the result was many different colors of blue.  Try making 2 batches from water from different places..

This dye can be used for approximately 8 months to a year.  It’s best to make a new batch after that time.  Enjoy.

These gallon pickle jars are hard to acquire.  I had 5 or 6 from many years ago and have acquired a few along the way at tag sales and flea markets.   They were not expensive.  I have two that are allocated for dye purposes, once you do use them for dye they should not be used for any food storage.  The rest I do use for food storage. The Following picture was taken after only a couple of hours, I will post more picture of the dye in progress.

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Many thanks for reading my blog on this first day of Spring.  Hope your day is wonderful.  Carole